Voices from New Mexico's Space History
Voices from New Mexico's Space History
Different quotations from New Mexico space pioneers appear on this page monthly. This is the June 2018 installment.
Different quotations from New Mexico space pioneers appear on this page monthly. This is the June 2018 installment.
This excerpt is from Chapter 2 of NASA's This New Ocean: A History of Project Mercury, available at hq.nasa.gov/pao/History/SP-4201/toc.htm.

   During the six-year hiatus [1952-1957] in animal rocket experminetation in this country, investigators had to resort to the aircraft, "the oldest aeromedican laboratory," for studying the weightless phenomenon. In 1950, Friz and Heinz Haber, of the Air Force School of Aviation Medicine, had considered various ways of simulating zero g for medical experiments. Discarding the free fall and the elevator ride, the Habers concluded tat the best technique involved an airplane flight along a vertical parabola, or "Keplerian trajectory." If properly executed, such a maneuver could provide as much as 35 seconds of zero g and a somewhat longer period of subgravity....
   In 1953 a small group comprising the Space Biology Branch of the Aeromedical Field Laboratory at Holloman Air Force Base [in New Mexico] inaugurated an ambitious program of parabolic flights to continue the investigations of weightless flight.... Supervised by Major David G. Simons, a physician who acted as test subject on many occasions, the Holloman study for two years utilized T-33 and F-89 jet aircraft. Late in 1955 ... the standard tool for zero g research became the F-94C, which offered a longer parabola than other aircraft and thus a longer period of weightlessness....
   [Researchers at Holloman and at Randolph Air Force Base] carried out numerous eye-hand coordination tests, for example, wherein a subject tried to make crosses in a pattern or hit a target with a metal stylus.... The Air Force scientists also studied eating and drinking, bladder function, and disorientation after awakening during weightlessness; the functions of zero g of various animals, especially cats whose vestibular organs had been removed.

See previously featured quotes on the following pages:
Voices Archives for the current year
[Voices Archives from 2017 were lost in a computer crash]
2016 Voices Archives
2015 Voices Archives
2014 Voices Archives
2013 Voices Archives
2012 Voices Archives
2011 Voices Archives


Photo Credits
Robert Goddard towing one of his rockets to the launch site near Roswell about 1931, courtesy of NASA.

WhiteKnightTwo carrying SpaceShipTwo at Spaceport America runway dedication flyover, photo by Loretta Hall.


Unless otherwise credited, all material on this site is © Loretta Hall 2010-2018.

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This excerpt is from Chapter 2 of NASA's This New Ocean: A History of Project Mercury, available at https://www.hq.nasa.gov/pao/History/SP-4201/toc.htm.

   During the six-year hiatus [1952-1957] in animal rocket experminetation in this country, investigators had to resort to the aircraft, "the oldest aeromedican laboratory," for studying the weightless phenomenon. In 1950, Friz and Heinz Haber, of the Air Force School of Aviation Medicine, had considered various ways of simulating zero g for medical experiments. Discarding the free fall and the elevator ride, the Habers concluded tat the best technique involved an airplane flight along a vertical parabola, or "Keplerian trajectory." If properly executed, such a maneuver could provide as much as 35 seconds of zero g and a somewhat longer period of subgravity....
   In 1953 a small group comprising the Space Biology Branch of the Aeromedical Field Laboratory at Holloman Air Force Base [in New Mexico] inaugurated an ambitious program of parabolic flights to continue the investigations of weightless flight.... Supervised by Major David G. Simons, a physician who acted as test subject on many occasions, the Holloman study for two years utilized T-33 and F-89 jet aircraft. Late in 1955 ... the standard tool for zero g research became the F-94C, which offered a longer parabola than other aircraft and thus a longer period of weightlessness....
   [Researchers at Holloman and at Randolph Air Force Base] carried out numerous eye-hand coordination tests, for example, wherein a subject tried to make crosses in a pattern or hit a target with a metal stylus.... The Air Force scientists also studied eating and drinking, bladder function, and disorientation after awakening during weightlessness; the functions of zero g of various animals, especially cats whose vestibular organs had been removed.




See previously featured quotes on the following pages:
        Voices Archives for the current year
            [2017 Voices Archives were lost in a computer crash]
        2016 Voices Archives for quotes posted during 2016
        2015 Voices Archives for quotes posted during 2015
        2014 Voices Archives for quotes posted during 2014
        2013 Voices Archives for quotes posted during 2013
        2012 Voices Archives for quotes posted during 2012
        2011 Voices Archives for quotes posted during 2011


Photo Credits
Robert Goddard towing one of his rockets to the launch site near Roswell about 1931, courtesy of NASA.

WhiteKnightTwo carrying SpaceShipTwo at Spaceport America runway dedication flyover, photo by Loretta Hall.


Unless otherwise credited, all material on this site is
© Loretta Hall 2010-2018.

For more information about New Mexico's contributions to space exploration, visit the New Mexico Museum of Space History.
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For more information about New Mexico's contributions to space exploration, visit the New Mexico Museum of Space History.