Voices from New Mexico's Space History
Voices from New Mexico's Space History
Different quotations from New Mexico space pioneers appear on this page monthly. This is the November 2017 installment.
Different quotations from New Mexico space pioneers appear on this page monthly. This is the November 2017 installment.
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This excerpt about the Manhigh I flight in 1957 is taken from Come Up and Get Me by Joe Kittinger, who piloted that balloon flight.

As I passed 72,400 feet, I saluted Army Air Service captains Orville Anderson and Albert Stevens, who held the altitude record. Their Explorer II flight in November 1935 had established a balloon altitude mark that had stood for twenty-two years. They were true pioneers, but there was a crucial difference between their flight and mine. The Explorer project's two-man crew had been engaged in general scientific observation and measurement; we were preparing for space flight with a lone astronaut.

About this point, the world outside my windows began to change. The pale blue of the sky that we're used to seeing from Earth was still visible in a thick band along the horizon, but if I let my eyes drift up, I could see the skay gradually darken from dark blue to indigo to an almost indescribable black. It was the blackest black I'd ever seen. Blacker than ink. And it was morning!




See previously featured quotes on the following pages:
        Voices Archives for the current year
        2016 Voices Archives for quotes posted during 2016
        2015 Voices Archives for quotes posted during 2015
        2014 Voices Archives for quotes posted during 2014
        2013 Voices Archives for quotes posted during 2013
        2012 Voices Archives for quotes posted during 2012
        2011 Voices Archives for quotes posted during 2011


Photo Credits
Robert Goddard towing one of his rockets to the launch site near Roswell about 1931, courtesy of NASA.

WhiteKnightTwo carrying SpaceShipTwo at Spaceport America runway dedication flyover, photo by Loretta Hall.


Unless otherwise credited, all material on this site is
© Loretta Hall 2010-2017.

This excerpt about the Manhigh I flight in 1957 is taken from Come Up and Get Me by Joe Kittinger, who piloted that balloon flight.

As I passed 72,400 feet, I saluted Army Air Service captains Orville Anderson and Albert Stevens, who held the altitude record. Their Explorer II flight in November 1935 had established a balloon altitude mark that had stood for twenty-two years. They were true pioneers, but there was a crucial difference between their flight and mine. The Explorer project's two-man crew had been engaged in general scientific observation and measurement; we were preparing for space flight with a lone astronaut.

About this point, the world outside my windows began to change. The pale blue of the sky that we're used to seeing from Earth was still visible in a thick band along the horizon, but if I let my eyes drift up, I could see the skay gradually darken from dark blue to indigo to an almost indescribable black. It was the blackest black I'd ever seen. Blacker than ink. And it was morning!




See previously featured quotes on the following pages:
Voices Archives for the current year
2016 Voices Archives
2015 Voices Archives
2014 Voices Archives
2013 Voices Archives
2012 Voices Archives
2011 Voices Archives


Photo Credits
Robert Goddard towing one of his rockets to the launch site near Roswell about 1931, courtesy of NASA.

WhiteKnightTwo carrying SpaceShipTwo at Spaceport America runway dedication flyover, photo by Loretta Hall.


Unless otherwise credited, all material on this site is © Loretta Hall 2010-2017.

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For more information about New Mexico's contributions to space exploration, visit the New Mexico Museum of Space History.
Be notified of
page updates
it's private
powered by
ChangeDetection
For more information about New Mexico's contributions to space exploration, visit the New Mexico Museum of Space History.