Voices from New Mexico's Space History
Voices from New Mexico's Space History
Different quotations from New Mexico space pioneers appear on this page monthly. This is the August 2018 installment.
Different quotations from New Mexico space pioneers appear on this page monthly. This is the August 2018 installment.
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This excerpt is from parachuting.com's article about Joe Kittinger, an Air Force test pilot actively involved in space research programs at Holloman Air Force Base in New Mexico in the 1950s and 1960s.

After Man High, Kittinger skippered Project Excelsior, meaning "Ever Upward" in Latin, which investigated aircraft bailout methods at extremely high altitudes. Nobody knew for sure if man could survive such a plummet, so, of course, Kittinger volunteered for the job. As the guinea pig in the gondola, he leapt three times from a balloon at the very edge of space, plunging to Earth in an experimental space suit and a prototype parachute rig equipment built by the lowest bidder. One mistake in this hostile environment frostbiting temperatures, oxygen-starved air and a near vacuum that would boil and bubble blood like a shaken can of cola could have killed him. And if Kittinger had tumbled into a flat spin, possibly exceeding 200 rpms, he would have whirled faster than a pinwheel in a tornado, pureeing all of his internal organs.

"You wouldn't be dizzy, you'd be dead," Kittinger said. "It's something you wanted to stay away from."



See previously featured quotes on the following pages:
        Voices Archives for the current year
            [2017 Voices Archives were lost in a computer crash]
        2016 Voices Archives for quotes posted during 2016
        2015 Voices Archives for quotes posted during 2015
        2014 Voices Archives for quotes posted during 2014
        2013 Voices Archives for quotes posted during 2013
        2012 Voices Archives for quotes posted during 2012
        2011 Voices Archives for quotes posted during 2011


Photo Credits
Robert Goddard towing one of his rockets to the launch site near Roswell about 1931, courtesy of NASA.

WhiteKnightTwo carrying SpaceShipTwo at Spaceport America runway dedication flyover, photo by Loretta Hall.


Unless otherwise credited, all material on this site is
© Loretta Hall 2010-2018.

This excerpt is from parachuting.com's article about Joe Kittinger, an Air Force test pilot actively involved in space research programs at Holloman Air Force Base in New Mexico in the 1950s and 1960s.

After Man High, Kittinger skippered Project Excelsior, meaning "Ever Upward" in Latin, which investigated aircraft bailout methods at extremely high altitudes. Nobody knew for sure if man could survive such a plummet, so, of course, Kittinger volunteered for the job. As the guinea pig in the gondola, he leapt three times from a balloon at the very edge of space, plunging to Earth in an experimental space suit and a prototype parachute rig - equipment built by the lowest bidder. One mistake in this hostile environment - frostbiting temperatures, oxygen-starved air and a near vacuum that would boil and bubble blood like a shaken can of cola - could have killed him. And if Kittinger had tumbled into a flat spin, possibly exceeding 200 rpms, he would have whirled faster than a pinwheel in a tornado, pureeing all of his internal organs.

"You wouldn't be dizzy, you'd be dead," Kittinger said. "It's something you wanted to stay away from."

See previously featured quotes on the following pages:
Voices Archives for the current year
[Voices Archives from 2017 were lost in a computer crash]
2016 Voices Archives
2015 Voices Archives
2014 Voices Archives
2013 Voices Archives
2012 Voices Archives
2011 Voices Archives


Photo Credits
Robert Goddard towing one of his rockets to the launch site near Roswell about 1931, courtesy of NASA.

WhiteKnightTwo carrying SpaceShipTwo at Spaceport America runway dedication flyover, photo by Loretta Hall.


Unless otherwise credited, all material on this site is © Loretta Hall 2010-2018.

For more information about New Mexico's contributions to space exploration, visit the New Mexico Museum of Space History.
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For more information about New Mexico's contributions to space exploration, visit the New Mexico Museum of Space History.