Voices from New Mexico's Space History
Voices from New Mexico's Space History
Different quotations from New Mexico space pioneers appear on this page monthly. This is the November 2018 installment.
Different quotations from New Mexico space pioneers appear on this page monthly. This is the November 2018 installment.
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This month's excerpt comes from Red Rover by Roger Weins, a geochemist who was principal investigator for ChemCam instrument aboard the Curiosity rover on Mars.

   The Space Instrumentation group at Los Alamos [National Laboratory] was located in several double-wide trailers along a canyon at the back of the main lab site. The fact that it was relegated to the far corner of the Los Alamos lab complex was symptomatic of a larger issue. The lab management paid little attention to our group, as we were doing nonclassified work far removed from the main mission of the lab. Still, the people in this division had already flown some four hundred instruments in space by the time I arrived.
   As space scientists, we were big fish in a small pond. There were only a handful of people at Los Alamos who were involved in NASA projects. It was a perfect place to live as a "renaissance person." Rather than being forced to specialize in a certain part of the solar system or a certain type of instrument, we could try our hand at many different areas. I liked the freedom; the possibilities, like the landscapes, were wide open.


See previously featured quotes on the following pages:
        Voices Archives for the current year
            [2017 Voices Archives were lost in a computer crash]
        2016 Voices Archives for quotes posted during 2016
        2015 Voices Archives for quotes posted during 2015
        2014 Voices Archives for quotes posted during 2014
        2013 Voices Archives for quotes posted during 2013
        2012 Voices Archives for quotes posted during 2012
        2011 Voices Archives for quotes posted during 2011


Photo Credits
Robert Goddard towing one of his rockets to the launch site near Roswell about 1931, courtesy of NASA.

WhiteKnightTwo carrying SpaceShipTwo at Spaceport America runway dedication flyover, photo by Loretta Hall.


Unless otherwise credited, all material on this site is
© Loretta Hall 2010-2018.

This month's excerpt comes from Red Rover by Roger Weins, a geochemist who was principal investigator for ChemCam instrument aboard the Curiosity rover on Mars.

   The Space Instrumentation group at Los Alamos [National Laboratory] was located in several double-wide trailers along a canyon at the back of the main lab site. The fact that it was relegated to the far corner of the Los Alamos lab complex was symptomatic of a larger issue. The lab management paid little attention to our group, as we were doing nonclassified work far removed from the main mission of the lab. Still, the people in this division had already flown some four hundred instruments in space by the time I arrived.
   As space scientists, we were big fish in a small pond. There were only a handful of people at Los Alamos who were involved in NASA projects. It was a perfect place to live as a "renaissance person." Rather than being forced to specialize in a certain part of the solar system or a certain type of instrument, we could try our hand at many different areas. I liked the freedom; the possibilities, like the landscapes, were wide open.

See previously featured quotes on the following pages:
Voices Archives for the current year
[Voices Archives from 2017 were lost in a computer crash]
2016 Voices Archives
2015 Voices Archives
2014 Voices Archives
2013 Voices Archives
2012 Voices Archives
2011 Voices Archives


Photo Credits
Robert Goddard towing one of his rockets to the launch site near Roswell about 1931, courtesy of NASA.

WhiteKnightTwo carrying SpaceShipTwo at Spaceport America runway dedication flyover, photo by Loretta Hall.


Unless otherwise credited, all material on this site is © Loretta Hall 2010-2018.

For more information about New Mexico's contributions to space exploration, visit the New Mexico Museum of Space History.
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For more information about New Mexico's contributions to space exploration, visit the New Mexico Museum of Space History.