Voices from New Mexico's Space History
Voices from New Mexico's Space History
Different quotations from New Mexico space pioneers appear on this page monthly. This is the May 2018 installment.
Different quotations from New Mexico space pioneers appear on this page monthly. This is the May 2018 installment.
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This excerpt is from "The astronomer who discovered Pluto in 1930 still keeps an eye of the sky from his backyard in New Mexico" in the May 1991 issue of Smithsonian magazine:

World War II took him away from the science he loved. During the war he taught Navy navigators in Flagstaff [Arizona] and afterward, in what has to be one of the worst displays of ingratitude in the history of science, he was told he'd have to leave the [Lowell] observatory because of a budget crunch. After nine years at White Sands Missile Range developing telescopes to watch rockets in flight, he went to New Mexico State University to teach....

Even in a fairly active retirement, his first love remains the sky. The backyard of his house in Las Cruces [New Mexico] bristles with telescopes, including one with a 16-inch mirror. On a clear evening, we go out to observe. We use a 10-inch instrument attached to the chassis of an old lawn mower so that it can be wheeled around....

As we stroll back toward the house, he pauses at another of his telescopes. Pointing out some details ("This shaft came from a 1910 Buick, this stand's from an old cream separator"), Tombaugh displays the very telescope he built as a farmboy in Kansas....

"I got a letter from the Smithsonian a while back. They said they wanted it for the museum." He pats the instrument lovingly. "I told them they couldn't have it. I'm not through using it yet!"

See previously featured quotes on the following pages:
Voices Archives for the current year
2016 Voices Archives
2015 Voices Archives
2014 Voices Archives
2013 Voices Archives
2012 Voices Archives
2011 Voices Archives


Photo Credits
Robert Goddard towing one of his rockets to the launch site near Roswell about 1931, courtesy of NASA.

WhiteKnightTwo carrying SpaceShipTwo at Spaceport America runway dedication flyover, photo by Loretta Hall.


Unless otherwise credited, all material on this site is © Loretta Hall 2010-2018.

This excerpt is from "The astronomer who discovered Pluto in 1930 still keeps an eye of the sky from his backyard in New Mexico" in the May 1991 issue of Smithsonian magazine:

World War II took him away from the science he loved. During the war he taught Navy navigators in Flagstaff [Arizona] and afterward, in what has to be one of the worst displays of ingratitude in the history of science, he was told he'd have to leave the [Lowell] observatory because of a budget crunch. After nine years at White Sands Missile Range developing telescopes to watch rockets in flight, he went to New Mexico State University to teach....

Even in a fairly active retirement, his first love remains the sky. The backyard of his house in Las Cruces [New Mexico] bristles with telescopes, including one with a 16-inch mirror. On a clear evening, we go out to observe. We use a 10-inch instrument attached to the chassis of an old lawn mower so that it can be wheeled around....

As we stroll back toward the house, he pauses at another of his telescopes. Pointing out some details ("This shaft came from a 1910 Buick, this stand's from an old cream separator"), Tombaugh displays the very telescope he built as a farmboy in Kansas....

"I got a letter from the Smithsonian a while back. They said they wanted it for the museum." He pats the instrument lovingly. "I told them they couldn't have it. I'm not through using it yet!"




See previously featured quotes on the following pages:
        Voices Archives for the current year
        2016 Voices Archives for quotes posted during 2016
        2015 Voices Archives for quotes posted during 2015
        2014 Voices Archives for quotes posted during 2014
        2013 Voices Archives for quotes posted during 2013
        2012 Voices Archives for quotes posted during 2012
        2011 Voices Archives for quotes posted during 2011


Photo Credits
Robert Goddard towing one of his rockets to the launch site near Roswell about 1931, courtesy of NASA.

WhiteKnightTwo carrying SpaceShipTwo at Spaceport America runway dedication flyover, photo by Loretta Hall.


Unless otherwise credited, all material on this site is
© Loretta Hall 2010-2018.

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For more information about New Mexico's contributions to space exploration, visit the New Mexico Museum of Space History.
Be notified of
page updates
it's private
powered by
ChangeDetection
For more information about New Mexico's contributions to space exploration, visit the New Mexico Museum of Space History.