Voices from New Mexico's Space History
Different quotations from New Mexico space pioneers appear on this page monthly. This is the August 2020 installment.
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This month's excerpt comes from David Darling's Internet Encyclopedia of Science's entry on Project Stargazer. See the encyclopedia at https://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedias1.html.

[The Stargazer Project was] An early balloon-borne project to carry out astronomical studies at very high altitude. It involved only one flight. On Dec. 13-14, 1962, Joseph Kittinger and William White, an astronomer, flew a gondola suspended beneath an 85-meter [280-foot] diameter Mylar balloon to a height of 25,000 m [15,500 mi] over New Mexico. In addition to obtaining telescopic observations from above 95% of Earth's atmosphere, the flight provided valuable data for the development of pressure suits and associated life support systems during a 13-hour stay at the edge of space.

In his book
The Pre-Astronauts, Craig Ryan described what happened on an attempted second Stargazer launch:

Kittinger and White were sealed into the pressurized gondola once again in the early morning hours of April 20, 1963. At dawn, only moments before the scheduled launch of Stargazer II, a static-electric charge tripped a release prematurely and freed the helium-filled balloon. The huge Mylar envelope, estimated to be worth $53,000, sped up into the sky and, within a few short minutes, disappeared from sight, leaving two very frustrated men sitting ingloriously in the stratosphere-ready but very earthbound capsule.



See previously featured quotes on the following pages:

      Voices Archives
for the current year
        2019 Voices Archives
        2018 Voices Archives
        [2017 Voices Archives were lost in a computer crash]
        2016 Voices Archives
        2015 Voices Archives
        2014 Voices Archives
        2013 Voices Archives
        2012 Voices Archives
        2011 Voices Archives


Photo Credits
Robert Goddard towing one of his rockets to the launch site near Roswell about 1931, courtesy of NASA.

WhiteKnightTwo carrying SpaceShipTwo at Spaceport America runway dedication flyover, photo by Loretta Hall.


Unless otherwise credited, all material on this site is
© Loretta Hall 2010-2020.

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For more information about New Mexico's contributions to space exploration, visit the New Mexico Museum of Space History.
This month's excerpt comes from David Darling's Internet Encyclopedia of Science's entry on Project Stargazer. See the encyclopedia at https://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedias1.html.

[The Stargazer Project was] An early balloon-borne project to carry out astronomical studies at very high altitude. It involved only one flight. On Dec. 13-14, 1962, Joseph Kittinger and William White, an astronomer, flew a gondola suspended beneath an 85-meter [280-foot] diameter Mylar balloon to a height of 25,000 m [15,500 mi] over New Mexico. In addition to obtaining telescopic observations from above 95% of Earth's atmosphere, the flight provided valuable data for the development of pressure suits and associated life support systems during a 13-hour stay at the edge of space.

In his book
The Pre-Astronauts, Craig Ryan described what happened on an attempted second Stargazer launch:

Kittinger and White were sealed into the pressurized gondola once again in the early morning hours of April 20, 1963. At dawn, only moments before the scheduled launch of Stargazer II, a static-electric charge tripped a release prematurely and freed the helium-filled balloon. The huge Mylar envelope, estimated to be worth $53,000, sped up into the sky and, within a few short minutes, disappeared from sight, leaving two very frustrated men sitting ingloriously in the stratosphere-ready but very earthbound capsule.




See previously featured quotes on the following pages:
Voices Archives for the current year
2019 Voices Archives
2018 Voices Archives
[Voices Archives from 2017 were lost in a computer crash]
2016 Voices Archives
2015 Voices Archives
2014 Voices Archives
2013 Voices Archives
2012 Voices Archives
2011 Voices Archives


Photo Credits
Robert Goddard towing one of his rockets to the launch site near Roswell about 1931, courtesy of NASA.

WhiteKnightTwo carrying SpaceShipTwo at Spaceport America runway dedication flyover, photo by Loretta Hall.


Unless otherwise credited, all material on this site is © Loretta Hall 2010-2019.

Voices from New Mexico's Space History
Different quotations from New Mexico space pioneers appear on this page monthly. This is the August 2020 installment.