Voices from New Mexico's Space History
Voices from New Mexico's Space History
Different quotations from New Mexico space pioneers appear on this page monthly. This is the April 2019 installment.
Different quotations from New Mexico space pioneers appear on this page monthly. This is the April 2019 installment.
This excerpt is from "Geology on the Moon" (calteches.library.caltech.edu/301/1/moon.pdf), which describes geology training for the Apollo astronauts who would be working on the Moon. Lee Silver was head of that training program.

[Silver] walked some of the roughest terrain in the world with the astronauts, taught them, and even cooked for them: on the high desert plateaus in the San Juan Mountains north of Durango, colorado; in the Mojave; along the Rio Grande Gorge out of Taos, New Mexico; at Kilauea Crater on the island of Hawaii; in southern California's San Gabriel range....

The Rio Grande Gorge near Taos, New Mexico, has some topographical similarities to Hadley Rille on the moon. Covering the traverse ... along the west side of the gorge was part of the training for the Apollo 15 lunar mission crews....

To simulate conditions that the Apollo 15 crew would confront at Hadley Rille, exercises were run at the rugged Rio Grande Gorce. Camera equipment was identical to that selected for the flight. Maps were simulated in the same format to be used on the lunar surface. The USGS staff prepared stations and technical problems that were facsimiles of those anticipated along the actual traverse. Exercises themselves took place at the precise time of day that duplicated light angles on the moon. Scott and Irwin snaked over the traverse on foot or in Grover [the earthbound cousin of the lunar rover], and flight directors monitored and directed from backrooms like those at Houston's NASA Manned Spacecraft Center.

[Astronaut James Irwin said,] When we got up there on the moon doing geology, we felt right at home using all the equipment. It was a little easier at 1/6th G.... I had to remind myself frequently that I was really on the moon.



See previously featured quotes on the following pages:
Voices Archives for the current year
[Voices Archives from 2017 were lost in a computer crash]
2016 Voices Archives
2015 Voices Archives
2014 Voices Archives
2013 Voices Archives
2012 Voices Archives
2011 Voices Archives


Photo Credits
Robert Goddard towing one of his rockets to the launch site near Roswell about 1931, courtesy of NASA.

WhiteKnightTwo carrying SpaceShipTwo at Spaceport America runway dedication flyover, photo by Loretta Hall.


Unless otherwise credited, all material on this site is © Loretta Hall 2010-2019.

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This excerpt is from "Geology on the Moon" (http://calteches.library.caltech.edu/301/1/moon.pdf), which describes geology training for the Apollo astronauts who would be working on the Moon. Lee Silver was head of that training program.

[Silver] walked some of the roughest terrain in the world with the astronauts, taught them, and even cooked for them: on the high desert plateaus in the San Juan Mountains north of Durango, colorado; in the Mojave; along the Rio Grande Gorge out of Taos, New Mexico; at Kilauea Crater on the island of Hawaii; in southern California's San Gabriel range....

The Rio Grande Gorge near Taos, New Mexico, has some topographical similarities to Hadley Rille on the moon. Covering the traverse ... along the west side of the gorge was part of the training for the Apollo 15 lunar mission crews....

To simulate conditions that the Apollo 15 crew would confront at Hadley Rille, exercises were run at the rugged Rio Grande Gorce. Camera equipment was identical to that selected for the flight. Maps were simulated in the same format to be used on the lunar surface. The USGS staff prepared stations and technical problems that were facsimiles of those anticipated along the actual traverse. Exercises themselves took place at the precise time of day that duplicated light angles on the moon. Scott and Irwin snaked over the traverse on foot or in Grover [the earthbound cousin of the lunar rover], and flight directors monitored and directed from backrooms like those at Houston's NASA Manned Spacecraft Center.

[Astronaut James Irwin said,] When we got up there on the moon doing geology, we felt right at home using all the equipment. It was a little easier at 1/6th G.... I had to remind myself frequently that I was really on the moon.




See previously featured quotes on the following pages:
        Voices Archives
for the current year
        2018 Voices Archives
        [2017 Voices Archives were lost in a computer crash]
        2016 Voices Archives
        2015 Voices Archives
        2014 Voices Archives
        2013 Voices Archives
        2012 Voices Archives
        2011 Voices Archives


Photo Credits
Robert Goddard towing one of his rockets to the launch site near Roswell about 1931, courtesy of NASA.

WhiteKnightTwo carrying SpaceShipTwo at Spaceport America runway dedication flyover, photo by Loretta Hall.


Unless otherwise credited, all material on this site is
© Loretta Hall 2010-2019.

For more information about New Mexico's contributions to space exploration, visit the New Mexico Museum of Space History.
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For more information about New Mexico's contributions to space exploration, visit the New Mexico Museum of Space History.