June 23: The second annual Spaceport America Cup concluded with 124 teams from 10 countries competing. During the event, 95 rocket launches took place. A total of 18 teams won awards in six categories involving rockets with different propulsion systems aiming for apogees of 10,000 or 30,000 feet.

June 20
: Albuquerque-based SolAero Technologies Corp. won its first major contract for a new, powerful but low-weight solar cell for spacecraft. Already a prominent supplier for spacecraft solar cells, the company has developed a cell that generates 10 times the power of current technology at less than 60 percent of the weight.

June 19
: An Albuquerque Journal article highlighted the Los Alamos National Laboratory's successful test of a small version of a nuclear reactor that will ultimately be capable of providing power for long-term space missions. A full-size Kilopower reactor could generate enough electricity to support a four-person crew on Mars or the Moon. Five months of tests concluded with a series full-power, normal operations interrupted by power-downs.

June 8
: Base 11 announced its Space Challenge, a competition fo encourage student-led university teams to design, build, and launch a single-stage, liquid-fueled rocket to an altitude of 62 miles by December 30, 2021. The first team to succeed will win a $1 million prize. Launches will take place at Spaceport America.

May 29
: Virgin Galactic's SpaceShipTwo Unity completed its second powered test flight. Its hybrid engine fired for 31 seconds, propelling the craft to an altitude of 114,500 feet (21.7 miles) at a maximum speed of  Mach 1.9.

May 27
: A team of Rocketry Club students from Princeton University launched their two-stage, solid-fuel from Spaceport America. It was the 102nd vertical launch at the facility since 2006. The rocket, which was designed to be the smallest rocket ever built that is capable of crossing the Karman line into space. However, a second-stage ignition failure kept the rocket from reaching the desired altitude of at least 62 miles.

May 2
: NASA announced a successful series of tests of the Kilopower Reactor Using Stirling Technology (KRUSTY), a nuclear reactor being developed to provide power for long-duration space missions. Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico is the lead designer of the reactor.

April 29
: Congratulations to Solstar Space Company of Santa Fe for sending the first tweet from space via its Schmitt Space Communicator commercial wi-fi system! The system was one of eight payloads on Blue Origin's New Shepard flight today.

April 15:
The New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology's Rocket Team launched a Mustang VI-B rocket at Spaceport America. The reusable rocket reached an altitude of 24,127 feet and a speed of Mach 1.27 before landing successfully.

April 6
: Virgin Galactic's new SpaceShipTwo, VSS Unity, completed its first powered test flight. After release from the mothership at 46,500 feet, its hybrid rocket motor propelled it to Mach 1.87 during its 30-second burn. The ship reached an altitude of 84,271 feet (16 miles) before completing its glide landing.

April 4
: NASA contracted with an Albuquerque firm for logistics support services at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. For one year beginning May 1, L&M Technologies will provide services for equipment; motor pool and transportation; flight hardware support operations; shipping and receiving; mail; moves and furniture; property disposal and material, property and warehouse management.

March 27:
The Las Cruces Sun-News reported that a planned city visitor center in downtown will also function as a departure point for Spaceport America tours. Currently, all tours depart from Truth or Consequences, but the road approaching the spaceport from the south is being improved.

March 23:
Exos Aerospace announced it has completed a hover test of its SARGE (Suborbital Autonomous Rocket with GuidancE) rocket and has a launch license for the first flight of the reusable suborbital rocket at Spaceport America in April.
New Mexico Space News
New Mexico Space News
2018
2018
June 23: The second annual Spaceport America Cup concluded with 124 teams from 10 countries competing. During the event, 95 rocket launches took place. A total of 18 teams won awards in six categories involving rockets with different propulsion systems aiming for apogees of 10,000 or 30,000 feet.

June 20
: Albuquerque-based SolAero Technologies Corp. won its first major contract for a new, powerful but low-weight solar cell for spacecraft. Already a prominent supplier for spacecraft solar cells, the company has developed a cell that generates 10 times the power of current technology at less than 60 percent of the weight.

June 19
: An Albuquerque Journal article highlighted the Los Alamos National Laboratory's successful test of a small version of a nuclear reactor that will ultimately be capable of providing power for long-term space missions. A full-size Kilopower reactor could generate enough electricity to support a four-person crew on Mars or the Moon. Five months of tests concluded with a series full-power, normal operations interrupted by power-downs.

June 21-23
: Here's a special opportunity at Spaceport America! The second annual Spaceport America Cup competition begins tomorrow. Thursday through Saturday you can drive yourself to the spaceport and watch 130 college teams from around the world launch the rockets they have designed and built. Adult tickets are $20 for a three-day pass or $10 for one day. For details and to purchase tickets, go to https://www.spaceportamericacup.com.

June 8
: Base 11 announced its Space Challenge, a competition fo encourage student-led university teams to design, build, and launch a single-stage, liquid-fueled rocket to an altitude of 62 miles by December 30, 2021. The first team to succeed will win a $1 million prize. Launches will take place at Spaceport America.

May 29
: Virgin Galactic's SpaceShipTwo Unity completed its second powered test flight. Its hybrid engine fired for 31 seconds, propelling the craft to an altitude of 114,500 feet (21.7 miles) at a maximum speed of  Mach 1.9.

May 27
: A team of Rocketry Club students from Princeton University launched their two-stage, solid-fuel from Spaceport America. It was the 102nd vertical launch at the facility since 2006. The rocket, which was designed to be the smallest rocket ever built that is capable of crossing the Karman line into space. However, a second-stage ignition failure kept the rocket from reaching the desired altitude of at least 62 miles.

May 2
: NASA announced a successful series of tests of the Kilopower Reactor Using Stirling Technology (KRUSTY), a nuclear reactor being developed to provide power for long-duration space missions. Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico is the lead designer of the reactor.









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Photo Credits
Robert Goddard towing one of his rockets to the launch site near Roswell about 1931, courtesy of NASA.

WhiteKnightTwo carrying SpaceShipTwo at Spaceport America runway dedication flyover, photo by Loretta Hall.

Unless otherwise credited, all material on this site is © Loretta Hall 2010-2018.
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For more news, visit Virgin Galactic's and Spaceport America's websites.
The Virgin Galactic Gateway to Space at Spaceport America, viewed from the northwest.
Photo by Loretta Hall
The Virgin Galactic Gateway to Space at Spaceport America, viewed from the northeast.
Photo by Loretta Hall
Photo Credits
Robert Goddard towing one of his rockets to the launch site near Roswell about 1931, courtesy of NASA.

WhiteKnightTwo carrying SpaceShipTwo at Spaceport America runway dedication flyover, photo by Loretta Hall.

Unless otherwise credited, all material on this site is © Loretta Hall 2010-2018.
UP Aerospace launch
June 21, 2013
Spaceport America
Photo by Loretta Hall