Voices from New Mexico's Space History
Different quotations from New Mexico space pioneers appear on this page monthly. This is the November 2020 installment.
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After achieving acclaim as the discoverer of the then-planet Pluto, Clyde Tombaugh went to work at White Sands Proving Ground in southern New Mexico to help with America's space programs. One of his projects was to search for natural space debris that might damage or doom an eventual spaceflight to the Moon. This excerpt is from the 1956 book Secrets of Space Flight by Lloyd Mallan.

At the White Sands Proving Ground on a desert in New Mexico, Professor Clyde W. Tombaugh is analyzing the results of a program that he initiated: during certain months of the year, he uses a special telescope at Lowell Observatory in Arizona to search the area of space between Earth and the Moon. for the rest of the year, he inspects photographic plates made at Lowell in order to determine the existence and exact orbits of miniature natural moons that may exist in that area. Professor Tombaugh, whose keen eyesight and dedicated thoroughness were responsible for his discovery of the planet Pluto, has designed a new kind of telescope-camera that he and astronomers at Lowell use in the terrestrial-lunar space survey.

"This telescope," he says, "can locate a clean white tennis ball shining in the sunlight a thousand miles out from the Earth." It can also, he adds, locate a comparatively small rocket, such as the V-2 or Viking at a distance of 240,000 miles---which is the approximate distance between the Earth and Moon.



See previously featured quotes on the following pages:

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for the current year
        2019 Voices Archives
        2018 Voices Archives
        [2017 Voices Archives were lost in a computer crash]
        2016 Voices Archives
        2015 Voices Archives
        2014 Voices Archives
        2013 Voices Archives
        2012 Voices Archives
        2011 Voices Archives


Photo Credits
Robert Goddard towing one of his rockets to the launch site near Roswell about 1931, courtesy of NASA.

WhiteKnightTwo carrying SpaceShipTwo at Spaceport America runway dedication flyover, photo by Loretta Hall.


Unless otherwise credited, all material on this site is
© Loretta Hall 2010-2020.

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For more information about New Mexico's contributions to space exploration, visit the New Mexico Museum of Space History.
After achieving acclaim as the discoverer of the then-planet Pluto, Clyde Tombaugh went to work at White Sands Proving Ground in southern New Mexico to help with America's space programs. One of his projects was to search for natural space debris that might damage or doom an eventual spaceflight to the Moon. This excerpt is from the 1956 book Secrets of Space Flight by Lloyd Mallan.

At the White Sands Proving Ground on a desert in New Mexico, Professor Clyde W. Tombaugh is analyzing the results of a program that he initiated: during certain months of the year, he uses a special telescope at Lowell Observatory in Arizona to search the area of space between Earth and the Moon. for the rest of the year, he inspects photographic plates made at Lowell in order to determine the existence and exact orbits of miniature natural moons that may exist in that area. Professor Tombaugh, whose keen eyesight and dedicated thoroughness were responsible for his discovery of the planet Pluto, has designed a new kind of telescope-camera that he and astronomers at Lowell use in the terrestrial-lunar space survey.

"This telescope," he says, "can locate a clean white tennis ball shining in the sunlight a thousand miles out from the Earth." It can also, he adds, locate a comparatively small rocket, such as the V-2 or Viking at a distance of 240,000 miles---which is the approximate distance between the Earth and Moon.



See previously featured quotes on the following pages:
Voices Archives for the current year
2019 Voices Archives
2018 Voices Archives
[Voices Archives from 2017 were lost in a computer crash]
2016 Voices Archives
2015 Voices Archives
2014 Voices Archives
2013 Voices Archives
2012 Voices Archives
2011 Voices Archives


Photo Credits
Robert Goddard towing one of his rockets to the launch site near Roswell about 1931, courtesy of NASA.

WhiteKnightTwo carrying SpaceShipTwo at Spaceport America runway dedication flyover, photo by Loretta Hall.


Unless otherwise credited, all material on this site is © Loretta Hall 2010-2020.

Voices from New Mexico's Space History
Different quotations from New Mexico space pioneers appear on this page monthly. This is the November 2020 installment.