This excerpt is from "Geology on the Moon" (http://calteches.library.caltech.edu/301/1/moon.pdf), which describes geology training for the Apollo astronauts who would be working on the Moon. Lee Silver was head of that training program.

[Silver] walked some of the roughest terrain in the world with the astronauts, taught them, and even cooked for them: on the high desert plateaus in the San Juan Mountains north of Durango, colorado; in the Mojave; along the Rio Grande Gorge out of Taos, New Mexico; at Kilauea Crater on the island of Hawaii; in southern California's San Gabriel range....

The Rio Grande Gorge near Taos, New Mexico, has some topographical similarities to Hadley Rille on the moon. Covering the traverse ... along the west side of the gorge was part of the training for the Apollo 15 lunar mission crews....

To simulate conditions that the Apollo 15 crew would confront at Hadley Rille, exercises were run at the rugged Rio Grande Gorce. Camera equipment was identical to that selected for the flight. Maps were simulated in the same format to be used on the lunar surface. The USGS staff prepared stations and technical problems that were facsimiles of those anticipated along the actual traverse. Exercises themselves took place at the precise time of day that duplicated light angles on the moon. Scott and Irwin snaked over the traverse on foot or in Grover [the earthbound cousin of the lunar rover], and flight directors monitored and directed from backrooms like those at Houston's NASA Manned Spacecraft Center.

[Astronaut James Irwin said,] When we got up there on the moon doing geology, we felt right at home using all the equipment. It was a little easier at 1/6th G.... I had to remind myself frequently that I was really on the moon.

---
On April 24, 1964, Lonnie Zamora, a well respected police officer in Socorro, New Mexico, saw what has become one of the most prominent UFO sightings in history. Here some excerpts from his police report:

Suddenly noticed a shiny type object to south about 150 to 200 yards. It was off the road. At first glance, stopped . It looked, at first, like a car turned upside down.  Thought some kids might have turned over. Saw two people in white coveralls very close to the object. One of these persons seemed to turn and look straight at my car and seemed startled---seemed to jump quickly somewhat....

Object was like aluminum---it was whitish against the mesa background, but not chrome. Seemed like O in shape....

Stopped car.... Hardly turned around from car, when heard roar (was not exactly a blast) very loud roar---at that close was real loud....

Object was oval, in shape. It was smooth---no windows or doors....

The object seemed to lift up slowly, and to "get small" in the distance very fast.... It disappeared as it went over the mountain. It had no flame whatsoever as it was traveling over the ground, and no smoke or noise.

---
This excerpt is from
Animal Astronauts: They Opened the Way to the Stars (Prentice-Hall, 1963). It describes an episode at the Mercury Program's chimpanzee training facility at Holloman Air Force Base in Alamogoro, New Mexico.

Part of our chimp training program involved flying chimps in C-131 transports to get them used to flying. The pilots of these aircraft, of course, became rather knowledgeable about the whole program. Upon returning from these flights they call the control tower and advise, "I have a VIP aboard." Normally VIP means Very Important Person, but in this instance it meant Very Important Primate.

One day when taxiing in from a flight, one of the pilots decided to shake things up on the flight line. He put one of the more friendly chimps up in the co-pilot's seat and just as he moved onto the ramp toward the parking space the pilot ducked down. Now, always when an aircraft moves into the parking ramp there is a ground crewman giving signals, telling the pilot exactly where to park, easing him into the proper wheel chock position. The ground crewman concentrates on the position of the aircraft as it moves slowly into this position and does not look at the  pilot until a moment before the aircraft stops. You can imagine the expression on the ground crewman's face when he looked up and saw only the nonchalant chimpanzee staring back at him from the cockpit....

---
This excerpt is from a CNN report:

When temporary no-fly zones appear above US rocket launch sites, airlines end up paying huge fuel costs to fly around them, while passengers have to spend more of their precious time in the air.
In fact, a new study by Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University calculates that all the extra fuel required to avoid restricted airspace during rocket launches costs airlines cumulatively between $10,000 and $30,000 per liftoff.

One launch can create a ripple affecting thousands of airline passengers. Last February's SpaceX launch of its Falcon Heavy rocket delayed 563 airline flights resulting in 62 extra miles added to flights across the southeastern United States, according to a report by the Air Line Pilots Association. Each flight was delayed an average of eight minutes.

Elon Musk just launched our earthshaking new adventure
All this "results in planes sitting on the ground, longer routes, more fuel burn and longer flying times for passengers," said a written statement by A4A, an industry group that represents most major US airlines.

Note by NMSpaceHistory.com: Launch trajectory airspace at Spaceport America in New Mexico is always restricted because it is adjacent to White Sands Missile Range.
---

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Space Voices Archives

New Mexico's Space Voices Archives
2019 Voices entries will be archived here each month.

2019 Voices entries will be archived here each month.
 Home
This excerpt is from "Geology on the Moon" (http://calteches.library.caltech.edu/301/1/moon.pdf), which describes geology training for the Apollo astronauts who would be working on the Moon. Lee Silver was head of that training program.

[Silver] walked some of the roughest terrain in the world with the astronauts, taught them, and even cooked for them: on the high desert plateaus in the San Juan Mountains north of Durango, colorado; in the Mojave; along the Rio Grande Gorge out of Taos, New Mexico; at Kilauea Crater on the island of Hawaii; in southern California's San Gabriel range....

The Rio Grande Gorge near Taos, New Mexico, has some topographical similarities to Hadley Rille on the moon. Covering the traverse ... along the west side of the gorge was part of the training for the Apollo 15 lunar mission crews....

To simulate conditions that the Apollo 15 crew would confront at Hadley Rille, exercises were run at the rugged Rio Grande Gorce. Camera equipment was identical to that selected for the flight. Maps were simulated in the same format to be used on the lunar surface. The USGS staff prepared stations and technical problems that were facsimiles of those anticipated along the actual traverse. Exercises themselves took place at the precise time of day that duplicated light angles on the moon. Scott and Irwin snaked over the traverse on foot or in Grover [the earthbound cousin of the lunar rover], and flight directors monitored and directed from backrooms like those at Houston's NASA Manned Spacecraft Center.

[Astronaut James Irwin said,] When we got up there on the moon doing geology, we felt right at home using all the equipment. It was a little easier at 1/6th G.... I had to remind myself frequently that I was really on the moon.

---
On April 24, 1964, Lonnie Zamora, a well respected police officer in Socorro, New Mexico, saw what has become one of the most prominent UFO sightings in history. Here some excerpts from his police report:

Suddenly noticed a shiny type object to south about 150 to 200 yards. It was off the road. At first glance, stopped . It looked, at first, like a car turned upside down.  Thought some kids might have turned over. Saw two people in white coveralls very close to the object. One of these persons seemed to turn and look straight at my car and seemed startled---seemed to jump quickly somewhat....

Object was like aluminum---it was whitish against the mesa background, but not chrome. Seemed like O in shape....

Stopped car.... Hardly turned around from car, when heard roar (was not exactly a blast) very loud roar---at that close was real loud....

Object was oval, in shape. It was smooth---no windows or doors....

The object seemed to lift up slowly, and to "get small" in the distance very fast.... It disappeared as it went over the mountain. It had no flame whatsoever as it was traveling over the ground, and no smoke or noise.

---
This excerpt is from
Animal Astronauts: They Opened the Way to the Stars (Prentice-Hall, 1963). It describes an episode at the Mercury Program's chimpanzee training facility at Holloman Air Force Base in Alamogoro, New Mexico.

Part of our chimp training program involved flying chimps in C-131 transports to get them used to flying. The pilots of these aircraft, of course, became rather knowledgeable about the whole program. Upon returning from these flights they call the control tower and advise, "I have a VIP aboard." Normally VIP means Very Important Person, but in this instance it meant Very Important Primate.

One day when taxiing in from a flight, one of the pilots decided to shake things up on the flight line. He put one of the more friendly chimps up in the co-pilot's seat and just as he moved onto the ramp toward the parking space the pilot ducked down. Now, always when an aircraft moves into the parking ramp there is a ground crewman giving signals, telling the pilot exactly where to park, easing him into the proper wheel chock position. The ground crewman concentrates on the position of the aircraft as it moves slowly into this position and does not look at the  pilot until a moment before the aircraft stops. You can imagine the expression on the ground crewman's face when he looked up and saw only the nonchalant chimpanzee staring back at him from the cockpit....

---
This excerpt is from a CNN report:

When temporary no-fly zones appear above US rocket launch sites, airlines end up paying huge fuel costs to fly around them, while passengers have to spend more of their precious time in the air.
In fact, a new study by Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University calculates that all the extra fuel required to avoid restricted airspace during rocket launches costs airlines cumulatively between $10,000 and $30,000 per liftoff.

One launch can create a ripple affecting thousands of airline passengers. Last February's SpaceX launch of its Falcon Heavy rocket delayed 563 airline flights resulting in 62 extra miles added to flights across the southeastern United States, according to a report by the Air Line Pilots Association. Each flight was delayed an average of eight minutes.

Elon Musk just launched our earthshaking new adventure
All this "results in planes sitting on the ground, longer routes, more fuel burn and longer flying times for passengers," said a written statement by A4A, an industry group that represents most major US airlines.

Note by NMSpaceHistory.com: Launch trajectory airspace at Spaceport America in New Mexico is always restricted because it is adjacent to White Sands Missile Range.

---


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Photo Credits
Robert Goddard towing one of his rockets to the launch site near Roswell about 1931, courtesy of NASA.

WhiteKnightTwo carrying SpaceShipTwo at Spaceport America runway dedication flyover, photo by Loretta Hall.
Unless otherwise credited, all material on this site is © Loretta Hall 2010-2018.