New Mexico's
Space Voices Archives

New Mexico's Space Voices Archives
This excerpt is from Out of this World: New Mexico's Contributions to Space Travel:

E
ffie Ward's neighbors were frightened and furious. Bob Goddard had set off another one of his confounded rockets from the cabbage patch on his Aunt Effie's farm. This time, it was more than annoying, it was downright dangerous. They were not about to let him continue disrupting their peace and risking damage to their property. Massachusetts was not a proper place for these shenanigans.

He'd shot off the first one back in March of 1926. The rudimentary device [consisted of] two liquid fuel tanks and a combustion chamber connected by a 10-foot-long, spindly skeleton of metal fuel lines....

The first flight of a liquid-fuel rocket was as monumental as the first airplane flight had been, twenty-three years earlier. Goddard's rocket took 9½ seconds less to fly 11 feet higher and 85 feet farther. But the Wright Brothers' plane carried a person, and it flew a distance of 852 feet in 59 seconds later that same day. Maximum speeds: 60 miles an hour for the rocket and 34 miles an hour for the plane.

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This excerpt is from "Countdown to the X Prize Cup" by Wayne Mattson in the October 2004 issue of New Mexico Space Journal:

The government sponsored competitions among several manufacturers to develop single-stage launch vehicles. From 1991 to 1993 McDonnell-Douglas developed the Delta Clipper Experimental (DC-X) that would take off and land vertically. Over the next two years, the company conducted eight test flights at the White Sands Missile Range. The company then created a modified version, the Delta Clipper Experimental Advanced (DC-XA) and conducted four test flights, including a twenty-six hour turnaround time between the second and third flights, a first for any rocket. Unfortunately, after this success, bad fortune visited the project. First, the company got word the program was cancelled due to lack of funding by the U.S. government. With just enough funds left in the current contract for one last test flight, the DC-XA was launched for the fourth flight, but as it landed, one of the struts failed to extend, causing the vehicle to tip over and explode. Despite the unseemly end, the DC-X and DC-XA did prove the viability of a vertical takeoff and landing space vehicle.

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The following brief article appeared in the March 2, 1947, issue of the Albuquerque Journal, datelined El Paso, TX:

   Families of 13 German scientists who are working at Fort  Bliss laboratories in connection with the V-2 rocket tests at White Sands Proving Ground [in New Mexico] arrived today from Germany.
   The scientists, armed with flowers, were waiting at the Southern Pacific station  as the train pulled in. Some of the smaller children wept as they embraced their fathers, from whom they had been separated for two years.
   Dr. Herbert Axseer, who met his wife and two children from Landeshut, Bavaria, said the families arrived in New York Monday. Dr. Herman Langer of Dresden was joined by his wife, three children and his father-in-law, Anatole Koulikof.
   The scientists, including Wernher von Braun, 34, rocket inventor, have been contributing their knowledge and experience to the Army ordnance department's experiments at White Sands more than a year.

===

On December 20, 2017, Kevin Robinson-Avila reported the following in the Albuquerque Journal:

Spaceport America in southern New Mexico logged its busiest year in launch activity since construction of the facility began in 2006.

It hosted 14 vertical rocket launches by different Spaceport tenants during fiscal year 2017, plus two balloon flights by the Boeing Co. and horizontal flight tests of Virgin Galactic's WhiteKnightTwo, the mothership that will carry future passenger rockets part way to space when the company eventually launches commercial activities in New Mexico.

Others conducted launch-system testing during the year, and some 1,100 students descended on the Spaceport in June for a worldwide collegiate rocket competition dubbed the Spaceport America Cup. That weeklong event, organized by the Intercollegiate Rocket Engineering Competition, featured 60 launches of up to 30,000 feet by teams from a dozen countries.

That makes 101 launches to date out of the Spaceport, demonstrating the facility's potentially magnetic appeal to the emerging commercial space industry, Spaceport CEO Dan Hicks told the Albuquerque Economic Forum on Wednesday morning.

 


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Photo Credits
Robert Goddard towing one of his rockets to the launch site near Roswell about 1931, courtesy of NASA.

WhiteKnightTwo carrying SpaceShipTwo at Spaceport America runway dedication flyover, photo by Loretta Hall.
Unless otherwise credited, all material on this site is © Loretta Hall 2010-2018.
This excerpt is from Out of this World: New Mexico's Contributions to Space Travel:

Effie Ward's neighbors were frightened and furious. Bob Goddard had set off another one of his confounded rockets from the cabbage patch on his Aunt Effie's farm. This time, it was more than annoying, it was downright dangerous. They were not about to let him continue disrupting their peace and risking damage to their property. Massachusetts was not a proper place for these shenanigans.

He'd shot off the first one back in March of 1926. The rudimentary device [consisted of] two liquid fuel tanks and a combustion chamber connected by a 10-foot-long, spindly skeleton of metal fuel lines....

The first flight of a liquid-fuel rocket was as monumental as the first airplane flight had been, twenty-three years earlier. Goddard's rocket took 9½ seconds less to fly 11 feet higher and 85 feet farther. But the Wright Brothers' plane carried a person, and it flew a distance of 852 feet in 59 seconds later that same day. Maximum speeds: 60 miles an hour for the rocket and 34 miles an hour for the plane.
---
This excerpt is from "Countdown to the X Prize Cup" by Wayne Mattson in the October 2004 issue of New Mexico Space Journal:

The government sponsored competitions among several manufacturers to develop single-stage launch vehicles. From 1991 to 1993 McDonnell-Douglas developed the Delta Clipper Experimental (DC-X) that would take off and land vertically. Over the next two years, the company conducted eight test flights at the White Sands Missile Range. The company then created a modified version, the Delta Clipper Experimental Advanced (DC-XA) and conducted four test flights, including a twenty-six hour turnaround time between the second and third flights, a first for any rocket. Unfortunately, after this success, bad fortune visited the project. First, the company got word the program was cancelled due to lack of funding by the U.S. government. With just enough funds left in the current contract for one last test flight, the DC-XA was launched for the fourth flight, but as it landed, one of the struts failed to extend, causing the vehicle to tip over and explode. Despite the unseemly end, the DC-X and DC-XA did prove the viability of a vertical takeoff and landing space vehicle.
---
The following brief article appeared in the March 2, 1947, issue of the Albuquerque Journal, datelined El Paso, TX:

   Families of 13 German scientists who are working at Fort  Bliss laboratories in connection with the V-2 rocket tests at White Sands Proving Ground [in New Mexico] arrived today from Germany.
   The scientists, armed with flowers, were waiting at the Southern Pacific station  as the train pulled in. Some of the smaller children wept as they embraced their fathers, from whom they had been separated for two years.
   Dr. Herbert Axseer, who met his wife and two children from Landeshut, Bavaria, said the families arrived in New York Monday. Dr. Herman Langer of Dresden was joined by his wife, three children and his father-in-law, Anatole Koulikof.
   The scientists, including Wernher von Braun, 34, rocket inventor, have been contributing their knowledge and experience to the Army ordnance department's experiments at White Sands more than a year.
---
On December 20, 2017, Kevin Robinson-Avila reported the following in the Albuquerque Journal:

   Spaceport America in southern New Mexico logged its busiest year in launch activity since construction of the facility began in 2006.
   It hosted 14 vertical rocket launches by different Spaceport tenants during fiscal year 2017, plus two balloon flights by the Boeing Co. and horizontal flight tests of Virgin Galactic's WhiteKnightTwo, the mothership that will carry future passenger rockets part way to space when the company eventually launches commercial activities in New Mexico.
   Others conducted launch-system testing during the year, and some 1,100 students descended on the Spaceport in June for a worldwide collegiate rocket competition dubbed the Spaceport America Cup. That weeklong event, organized by the Intercollegiate Rocket Engineering Competition, featured 60 launches of up to 30,000 feet by teams from a dozen countries.
   That makes 101 launches to date out of the Spaceport, demonstrating the facility's potentially magnetic appeal to the emerging commercial space industry, Spaceport CEO Dan Hicks told the Albuquerque Economic Forum on Wednesday morning.